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The early decades of the twentieth century proved to be a violent time. These were years of great social, cultural, demographic, and economic transformation in Texas. From a civil war in Mexico to military preparations for World War I staged in Texas, residents witnessed turbulence abroad and at home. Historians estimate that anti-Mexican violence at the hands of vigilantes, state and local law enforcement, and US soldiers claimed the lives of hundreds, if not thousands, of ethnic Mexicans, American citizens and Mexican nationals alike. This period also saw the rise of anti-Black violence at the hands of vigilantes and law enforcement. The National Association for Advancement of Colored People ranked Texas third in the nation for the most lynchings on record. Mapping Violence is creating an expansive record of racially motivated acts of violence that include mob violence, lynchings, attempted lynchings, extralegal violence by law enforcement, torture, physical assault, and vigilante violence. In addition, this project records various strategies that Texas residents used to seek justice including journalism, legislation, legal claims, public protest, and investigations by state, federal, and foreign officials.
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